How to outline a nonfiction book?

By September 21, 2015OUTLINING

Don’t Write Another Nonfiction Book Until You Read This Post On How To Outline!

You wouldn’t try to run on a track without the proper running shoes, so what makes you think you can write a nonfiction masterpiece without the correct outline, or no outline?

Whether you need help outlining your first book or your 5th book, whether you’re incredibly talented and have an amazing way with words, you can ruin your book or worst not finish it because the content doesn’t follow an outline.

Outlines are about organization, structure and so much more!  An outline allows you to define a goal for every thought, write A LOT faster, and fill in gaps you might otherwise have missed.

An outline is a GPS to a completed book.

 Quitters never outline!

Let’s be honest, if you’re not using outlines already, you find yourself running in circles wearing improper running shoes and  wasting hours, days, weeks, or maybe even months of precious time.

How much time have you wasted writing something only to scrap it or eventually change the entire book?

How many times have you quit?

Don’t worry, I’ve been there too, WAY too many times. It wasn’t until I developed a solid outlining strategy that I started creating  books that I was proud to share.

5 important outline ingredients  

  1. An audience profile. When you use a great nonfiction outline template, every idea that you have is formed for one person, your reader. Writing your book without your readers properly defined is like trying to run track with the wrong shoes. You won’t get very far.

 

  1. A focused idea. So many times when we just start pounding on the keyboard and putting words together, we stray from the purpose of the book. You might be writing about how to become an entrepreneur and all of a sudden you find yourself going on about how important social media marketing is. Sure, it’s directly related, but does it fit the core message in your book?

 

  1. Reader transformation. The real reason that you’re writing a book is because you want and expect the reader to take action or change in some way. It’s no secret that the best content completely transforms an audience. Outlining how and where in your book you are going to present information is critical. You can have compelling material,  but it means nothing if it doesn’t fit the flow and mood of your reader.

 

  1. Expectation. Understanding what your audience is feeling and the kind of information they are expecting is the best way to keep them reading. After all the reader only really cares about WIIFT (What’s in it for them), and the WHAT. What will they gain from reading your nonfiction book?  The best way to outline a nonfiction book for them is to create points that will ultimately solve their pain point and or  get them to take action.

 

  1. A clear purpose. It doesn’t matter if your book is titled “This Will Teach You To Have Great Sex”. And if it has a super sexy cover with two of the most beautiful people in the world engaged in foreplay, your content is what they absorb and remember. So if you haven’t outlined all of your ideas so that they are aimed at fulfilling your end goal, your book will mean nothing to them. You’re just another hype person to them with a book that does not deliver.   Do it right, or do it over.

 

Benefits of using a nonfiction book outline template

The benefits of using a template to outline nonfiction books are tremendous. You might spend 20 to 30 minutes outlining each chapter for your next book but you’ll save hours when you’re ready to hit the keyboard. Not only that, you’ll find your book FLOWS BETTER. It will flow well, sound better, and be easy to read, engage them, and promote your reader’s transformation. If you aren’t writing to help your audience, what ARE you writing for? Stop spending time doing it over, since you didn’t do it right.  Eliminate frustrations.

Start outlining your nonfiction books using this template and deliver faster, spine gripping reads.

Want to read the mother of all outline books? Great, here it is.

Click Here.

Questions?    fbk@fbkwrites.com